• Home learning experiences of young children vary dramatically. Such disparities are troubling given strong links between early home environments and children’s development of motor, social, emotional, literacy, and numeracy skills, which are critical for later success. The Annenberg Institute Labs Parent Engagement via Text Messaging Research Project seeks to identify barriers that hinder beneficial parenting practices and approaches to overcoming those barriers by testing a set of interventions for parents of young children across the United States.

    Project PI: Susanna Loeb

  • The past 10 years have been a period of remarkable transformation for California’s PreK-12 public school system. The state has enacted sweeping changes to academic standards and assessments, and has also made dramatic shifts to its approach to resource allocation, decision-making authority, and accountability.

    As the state embarks on its next chapter of education policy, a thorough analysis of the PreK-12 system and how recently adopted reforms are working is again necessary to inform the decisions policymakers will make for the next 10 years.

    Project PI: Susanna Loeb

  • This project will comprehensively examine the effects of public investments on inequality in family behavior and children's academic learning. Recent research identifies significant class gaps in “parental investments,” defined by expenditures and time with children, as well as in children’s academic achievement. Public investments in children and families, though increasingly under threat, have the potential to reduce class gaps in child investments both by providing a “floor” of investment and potentially freeing low-income parents to reallocate expenditures and time use from basic necessities and basic care to development investment. 

    Project PI: Margot Jackson

  • The Socialization Areas in Which European American and Chinese Immigrant Mothers Express Warmth and Control
    Objective. The present study examined specific situations in which European American and Chinese immigrant mothers to the United States expressed warmth and control with their young children. Design. Ninety-four European American and 90 Chinese immigrant mothers of children ages 3–6 from middle-class families were interviewed. Results. European American and Chinese immigrant mothers viewed children’s independence, educational, social, emotional, and moral development as important. Specifically, mothers from both cultural groups discussed expressing warmth toward their children when: (1) structuring their children’s daily schedules and routines, (2) doing activities with their children, (3) their children experience difficulties, (4) being close, showing intimacy and communicating with their children, (5) their children engage in positive behaviors, and (6) educating their children.

    Project PI: Jin Li

  • PI: Janine Bempechat, Boston University, Co-PI: Jin Li, Brown University, and Co-PI: Susan Holloway, University of California, Berkeley

    Recent Publications:

    Kim, S.-J., Holloway, S., & Bempechat, J., & Li, J. (2018). Explaining adolescents’ affect: A time-use study of opportunities for support and autonomy across interpersonal contexts. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 27(8), 2384–2393 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10826-018-1092-6 

    Bempechat, J., Jimenez-Silva, M., Li, J., & Holloway, S. D. (2018). “Classes where kids learn/don’t learn a lot:” A study of Mexican American adolescents’ voices. In S. Jones & E. Sheffield (pp. 55-76). Why kids love (and hate) school: Reflections on difference. Gorham, ME: Meyers Education Press.

    Project PI: Jin Li

  • Co-PI: Heidi Fung is a research fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. She received her doctoral training in psychology and human development at the University of Chicago. After teaching in the Department of Psychology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, she returned to her native Taiwan in 1996 to assume her current post. She was a visiting scholar at the Yenching Institute and the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University in 2000-2001. Dr. Fung has long been interested in how to situate human development in socio-cultural contexts. Her research involves the socialization of emotion, daily disciplinary and moral training practices, and child-rearing beliefs across cultures. Recently she conducted multi-sited fieldwork in Taiwan and Vietnam to explore how socialization and family ties are practiced across borders and generations by Vietnamese marriage migrants to Taiwan. 

    Project PI: Jin Li