News

  • | Research Minutes

    new policy brief, coauthored by the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research‘s Elaine Allensworth and the Annenberg Institute‘s Nate Schwartz, offers some research-backed strategies for schools attempting to address student learning loss in the months ahead.

    Allensworth discusses the brief, the potential scope of learning loss, and a number of interventions and supports proven to accelerate learning for struggling students.

  • | Annenberg Institute

    “The COVID-19 global crisis has more-than-ever brought educational inequities to the forefront of decisions being made by districts across the country. Brown University is in a unique position by which to provide educational interventions to improve children’s academic, social and even economic outcomes, via online tutoring, a resource that historically, has only been available to students whose families can pay-to-learn. We’re excited to partner with TMS in this endeavor to continue serving our local students, families and communities.” – Soljane Martinez, Ed.D., Education Coordinator, Annenberg Institute at Brown University

  • | Chalkbeat

    The tutoring is expected to be conducted both virtually and in person. It’s appealing to policymakers now because there is plenty of both supply (recent college graduates and others looking for work) and demand (students who lost learning). It’s also appealing because research really does back intensive tutoring as a way to help students make big learning gains, though notably, most studies look at in-person rather than virtual tutoring.

  • | The New York Times
    Some organizations are working to make one-on-one instruction available to kids for whom private tutoring might not be an option. Brown University in Providence, R.I., has begun piloting a program connecting undergraduate students with seniors at a nearby public high school for remote tutoring sessions; it will expand across the district this fall. “We really hope that it’s going to ease that burden, at least a little bit, for many families,” said Soljane Martinez, the education coordinator at the university’s Annenberg Institute for School Reform.
  • | American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education

    What would schools need to do to stem learning losses experienced by students with disabilities? In a recent policy brief I co-authored with Sharon Vaughn and Lynn Fuchs, written as part of the EdResearch for Recovery series, we tried to answer this question. We reviewed the most rigorous evidence we could find from special education research, drawing on a series of meta-analyses and systematic reviews, as well as reviews conducted by the What Works Clearinghouse.

  • | Brown University

    As part of a pledge made after its groundbreaking 2006 report on the University’s historic ties to slavery, Brown University has fully funded a commitment to establish $10 million in endowed funds to support current and future generations of Pre-K-12 students in Providence.

    Brown’s governing board, the Corporation of Brown University, authorized this month the designation of $8.1 million in unrestricted University-endowed funds to complement $1.9 million raised over the years from donor support, achieving full funding for the Fund for the Education of the Children of Providence.

  • | Results for America

    Washington, DC - Today, the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University and Results for America released four new EdResearch for Recovery briefs from some of the country's leading researchers to help policymakers, educators, parents and others respond to the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • | NBC News

    The average student will likely return to school having retained only 63 percent to 68 percent of learning gains in reading and as little as 37 percent to 50 percent of learning gains in math compared to a typical year, according to projections in a working paper from NWEA, a nonprofit organization formerly known as the Northwest Evaluation Association, and scholars at Brown University and the University of Virginia.

    The gap widens along racial and socioeconomic lines.

  • | The Christian Science Monitor
    Plus, those who need school to open the most might be the least inclined to send their children back. Much attention has been paid to inequalities faced by minorities during the pandemic, from being overrepresented in frontline work, victim tallies, and among children in poor education outcomes. Yet Carycruz Bueno, a postdoctoral research associate at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University, says minority students might find a school setting too risky. For example, Black and Latino families are more likely to have intergenerational households with grandparents living under the same roof, she says, so those families will need to make collective decisions about whether a child returning to school in person is good for the health of the home.
  • | EdResearch for Recovery