Relations Among Cultural Learning Beliefs, Self‐Regulated Learning, and Academic Achievement for Low‐Income Chinese American Adolescents

Authors
Janine Bempechat,
Jin Li,
Samuel Ronfard
Year of publication
2016
Publication
Child Development
Volume/Issue
89(3)
Pages
851-861

This mixed‐methods study of urban low‐income, English‐proficient Chinese American, second‐generation 15‐year‐olds (conducted in 2004; = 32) examined the relation among the virtue model of learning communicated by parents and adolescents’ learning beliefs, self‐regulated learning (SRL) behaviors, and academic achievement. Analysis of in‐depth individual interviews revealed that for these adolescents, perceptions of family educational socialization predicted students’ endorsement of their culture's virtue‐oriented learning beliefs and that adolescents’ endorsement of these learning beliefs predicted their academic achievement. Importantly, adolescents’ reported that use of SRL strategies mediated the relationship between their endorsement of virtue‐oriented learning beliefs and their academic achievement. Findings are discussed in the context of further research linking cultural learning beliefs, SRL, and children's academic achievement.

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Suggested Citation:

Bempechat, J., Li, J., & Ronfard, S. (2016). Relations Among Cultural Learning Beliefs, Self‐Regulated Learning, and Academic Achievement for Low‐Income Chinese American Adolescents. Child Development, 89(3), 851-861